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24 Feb - 01 Mar 2020
Section 1 : CPO Price Trend
24 Feb - 01 Mar 2020
Section 2: Global Palm Oil Market Opportunities
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Section 1 : Palm Oil Price Fundamentals:
US Soybean & Soy Complex Situation and Outlook Report 2016
Ms. Sue Goll
Sue Goll is an agricultural consultant with over 25 years of experience as a cash grain merchandiser and futures industry participant. She worked at A.E. Staley for over six years as a grain merchandiser, trading soybeans, soymeal and corn out of the Des Moines, Iowa soybean processing plant, and the Lafayette, Indiana wet milling corn plant. As Grain Division Manager in Lafayette, Indiana, Ms. Goll oversaw grain merchandising, basis trading, truck and rail logistics, contracting with specialty corn growers and originated corn for two wet milling plants. She also managed offsetting hedge and spread strategies for the Lafayette futures position. Ms. Goll spent the next two years as a farm market advisor for a farm advisory firm assisting producers in cost of production analysis, grain storage management, marketing their crops using cash contracts, as well as, hedging with futures and options contracts. She joined the Chicago Board of Trade in 1989. During her six years with the exchange, she traveled worldwide teaching the use of agricultural futures and options markets. Ms. Goll travelled extensively to SE Asia, as well as Europe, working with producers and commercial businesses as they learned to apply futures and options markets to their cash market activities. Additionally, she specialized in the writings of educational materials and authored booklets for the commercial hedger, her primary focas being the practical use and application of futures and options markets. Her first hand knowledge and use of this complex subject matter and ability to simplify for practical application is what has made her work sought-after around the world. Also while with the Chicago Board of Trade, Ms. Goll worked in product development and marketing, speaking to agricultural businesses and diplomats worldwide on the benefits of futures and options markets. She designed extensive marketing campaigns for various products as well. Sue Goll has been self-employed as a consultant since 1995. In this capacity, she works with domestic and foreign businesses teaching cash/physical market fundamentals, the practical use of futures and options, and writing technical materials for publication. Ms. Goll has worked with clients in multiple countries including SE. Asia, Asia, S. Africa, Europe, S. America and the United States. Over her career, Ms. Goll has been a member of various Grain and Feed organizations and the National Grain and Feed Association. Goll is a graduate in Agricultural Economics from The Ohio State University. She graduated with honors, was a member of Towers Honorary and Sigma Alfa professional agricultural sorority.
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In recent months, the soy market has been one of volatility, sometimes for obvious reasons and sometimes not. Logically, the reduced 2015/16 crop out of Brazil & Argentina has added value to soybeans. It also makes sense that meteorological projections of a hot/dry US growing season has kept the market nervous.

Adding to the fire, the June 30, 2016 US planting report unexpectedly put US farmer soybean plantings lower than anticipated. There is an adequate old crop soybean supply around the world. With the reduced S. American crop, however, it is important that the US produce a large 2016 crop. If not, stocks could be drawn down to levels of just a few years ago--when we experienced significantly higher soybean prices.

A less obvious factor contributing to price volatility is investment fund activity. In recent months, investment money has been flowing into the commodities market. This is primarily due to poor returns on traditional investment tools, as well as weak economies worldwide. The flow of investment money into the commodities markets has resulted in large “long” fund positions in soybeans, keeping prices strong, even in old crop markets where we have no supply problem.

We will continue to gauge fund activity along with world economies and securities in an attempt to anticipate fund positions and the resulting influence on price.

Using a PowerPoint presentation of graphs & charts, this presentation will explore the current and historical supply & demand of the US and world soy complex. A verbal explanation will accompany each graph & chart.
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Now
15 - 30 Nov 2020
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